Gajar Halwa Tarts

Gajar Halwa Tarts

As a kid I remember eagerly waiting for winters. Marigold blooms, afternoon picnics, cozy blankets & of course bowls of warm & comforting gajar ka halwa (carrot pudding) made by maa.

I would help her peel & grate the carrots in the hope of getting a bigger share than my sis 😀 Those indeed were the days. During winters, we would rush home from school, throw our bags & run to the kitchen to see what’s in store, just in case we were in for any surprises! Truth be told, my sis was least interested, it was more my thing. Nothing gave me more joy than watching maa or our cook whip up something fancy in the kitchen while I eagerly waited for my turn to relish them 🙂

With the winters approaching, I have been craving gajar ka halwa for a while now & thought of following maa’s recipe with a few tweaks here & there & also turn it into tarts. Not only they taste heavenly but look pretty too! Go ahead & try it out.

Here’s the recipe (for 12 tarts):

Ingredients

450 g peeled & grated carrot

2 tbsp each of almonds, pistachios & cashew

60-70 ml ghee (clarified butter)

200 ml milk (I used oat milk)

130 ml condensed milk

1 tbsp sugar

1/2 tsp cardamom powder

12 tart shells (I used store bought)

Pistachios for garnishing

Method

Roughly chop 2 tbsp each of almonds, pistachios & cashew & roast them in 2 tsp ghee. Keep aside. Heat 50 ml ghee in a heavy bottomed pan & add about 450g peeled & grated carrot.

Mix well & cook until the colour changes & the carrot looks well combined.

Halfway add 2-3 tbsp ghee again & stir everything well.

After 10 mins add 200ml milk (I used oat milk).

Keep stirring & simmering on medium heat until the mixture reaches boiling point. This is where you add 130 ml of condensed milk & 1 tbsp sugar. Lower the heat & let everything combine well & come together.

Keep stirring for 10 more mins until the carrot no longer sticks to the pan. Stir in half a tsp of cardamom powder & the fried nuts back into the pan & continue to cook until the halwa turns dark orange/ reddish. 

You can have it as it is or make tarts like I did I used store bought tart shells. Fill each shell with the halwa (pudding) after poking holes in the tarts with a fork. Now line them up on a baking tray.

Before going in the oven

Preheat oven to 180-190 degree celsius & bake the tarts for 12-13 mins. Garnish with chopped pistachios & drizzle some condensed milk before serving.

Little cups of heaven 🙂

Shrimp Noodles with Bok Choy & Spring Onions

“Grow up, eat some chilli” as Seonkyoung Longest, the queen of Asian cuisine always says 😀 I followed her recipe to create this perfect street style shrimp chowmein or shrimp noodles with bok choy and spring onions (slightly modified). If there’s one dish I could eat all day, everyday, its got to be noodles. mmmmm !

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Growing up, whenever I was down or upset, my mum would cheer me up with a comforting bowl of noodles. Since then, it has pretty much been my constant soul food as life happened!

Do watch her YouTube channel for this and more lip smacking Asian food 🙂

 

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I have always been an ardent Asian food lover and living in Kuala Lumpur for more more than 5 years now, my love has grown by leaps and bounds. The truth is I have probably only scratched the surface on making or experiencing South East Asian food because its so rich and diverse! I am definitely learning more and more with each passing day.

So go ahead and try out this recipe. Whether you are a college student or a busy working woman, I can bet you won’t find any easier noodles recipe that tastes this awesome 😀

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Ingredients:

10-12 peeled and de-veined prawns/ shrimp (medium size is the best)

A pinch of black pepper

1 tbsp vinegar (any type would do)

1/2 cup chicken stock (if you don’t have, then simple warm water would do!)

2 tbsp oyster sauce

1 tsp dark soy sauce

1 thai red chilli chopped (lovely flavour yet low on heat)

5-6 fat cloves of garlic, chopped

1 inch of thinly julienne d ginger

3 medium sized diced shiitake mushroom

3 baby bok choy

3-4 spring onions, chopped into 2 inch long pieces

2-3 tbsp white oil for stir frying

A splash of sesame oil

Salt to taste

300-350 g cooked spaghetti or egg noodles (I used angel hair spaghetti)

Method:

Marinate the shrimps with vinegar and black pepper for at least 15 minutes. Heat a wok. Add oil and throw in the prawns to be stir fried for about a minute on high heat (important). Take them out and keep aside.

Add some more oil and heat up the wok again. Add chopped ginger, garlic and red chilies into the wok. Again carefully stir fry them for about a minute (make sure the heat is high and stir continuously). Now is the time to add the bok choy and mushrooms. Keep stir frying as you get the wonderful aroma.

Mix the oyster and dark soy sauce in the chicken stock to make the sauce for our chowmein. Now throw in the cooked (al dente) noodles and the sauce into the wok and keep stir frying. Let everything combine well. Add in the spring onion greens and mix again. Turn off the heat and add a splash of sesame oil for the final wonderful touch. That’s it! Voila 🙂

 

POTOLER DOLMA (Stuffed Pointed Gourd in a spicy gravy)

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Potoler Dolma is a delectable Bengali dish which is a quintessential part of any traditional function or festival. The stuffing/ filling used in this recipe is minced mutton (keema). But of course, the options are many, like- grated coconut, paneer (cottage cheese), minced prawns and all are equally delicious! As you know that my mum is here, so it goes without saying that this is her recipe 😀

I realized that I had never bothered to find out about the origin of the word ‘dolma’. Upon researching, I learned that, in Turkish, Dolma means stuffed. It is also commonly found in Middle Eastern cuisines. It was during the time of the Sultanate’s rule in Bengal that this dish ‘Potoler Dolma’ was created using local vegetables/ meat.

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I love the intricacy of the dish. From scooping out the flesh and seeds of potol, to frying it, preparing the stuffing, making the gravy and then cooking everything together. It’s a work of art and the end result is just brilliant! But I never really cooked it at home (lazy me :P) and now living away from home in India, I rarely get to eat it these days. But a small cute incident made me fall in love with the dish all over again and so now, I intend to make it once in a while.

It was during one of our trips back home in Calcutta, when my mum made potoler dolma among a host of other dishes, for her beloved son-in-law and me 😀 As S took a bite, he nonchalantly remarked that this dish was his favourite! It’s very rare that he actually says something like that because he is not much of a foodie and doesn’t really care what you give him to eat (savior at times 😛 ). Of course I know what he enjoys eating but he never says what his favourite is, so this was a sweet revelation for me. And when mum wanted to cook something special on naboborsho (Bengali New Year) which was on 15th of April, this dish was my first choice. It was pure joy to watch him savour his ‘favourite’ dish 🙂

Ingredients:

For Stuffing:

  • 10 potols/ pointed gourds
  • 250 g minced mutton
  • 2 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 2 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 large grated tomato
  • 2 medium potatoes, boiled and crumbled
  • Scooped flesh and seeds of the pointed gourds
  • 2 green chilies, finely chopped
  • ½ tsp turmeric powder
  • ½ tsp red chilli powder
  • 1 tsp garam masala powder
  • Salt to taste
  • Mustard oil for frying

For Gravy:

  • Whole garam masala, crushed (5-6 green cardamom, 4 cloves, 1 inch cinnamon stick)
  • 1 tsp jeera/ cumin seeds
  • 2-3 green chilies
  • 1 tbsp ginger paste
  • 2 medium tomatoes, pureed
  • ½ tsp turmeric powder
  • ½ tsp red chilli powder
  • 1 tsp cumin powder
  • 1 tsp coriander powder
  • Salt to taste
  • Sugar to taste
  • Mustard oil

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Method:

Deseeding the potol/ pointed gourd

Cut the two ends of a potol and very lightly scrape it using a blunt knife. Now carefully scoop out the flesh and the seeds from inside without breaking the potol. You can use a fork or the back of a small spoon to do this.  Keep the seeds and flesh aside to be used later.

Now rub a little salt and turmeric on inside and outside of the potols and fry them in mustard oil. Keep aside to cool.

Stuffing:

Heat some mustard oil in a kadhai/ wok and add chopped onions. Stir for a while and when they get soft, add ginger-garlic paste. Stir for a minute or till the raw smell goes away, now add the tomatoes and throw in green chilies. Fry well. Add turmeric powder, red chilli powder and garam masala and mix everything well. Now add the keema (minced mutton), flesh and seeds of potols, salt and mix well. Cook for a while till you see oil separating from the mix. Now mash the potatoes and add into the stuffing mix. Combine everything well and cook till the gravy dries up. Let it cool.

Now fill the scooped out and fried potols with the stuffing. Make sure that they are stuffed till the edge tightly. Keep a little stuffing aside to be added into the gravy later.

Gravy:

In the same wok, heat some more mustard oil, add some sugar to get a rich red colour of the gravy. Once it caramelizes, add crushed whole garam masalas, cumin seeds and green chilies. Once the aroma of the masala releases, add ginger paste. Stir for a while. In a small cup, mix turmeric powder, red chili powder, cumin powder and coriander powder with some water to make a paste and add into the gravy. Throw in the tomato puree and keep stirring till you see oil separating from the masalas. Now add water and salt and cover the kadhai and let it come to a boil (medium flame). Now add the potols into the gravy along with the extra stuffing. Cover and now cook on a low flame. When gravy thickens to your desired consistency, add some freshly ground garam masala and switch off the gas. Cover the wok and let it get a standing time of at least 10 minutes.

Serve hot with plain white rice.

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NOLEN GURER PAYESH (Rice Pudding with Date Palm Jaggery)

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For me, this very name brings back a lot of memories. No festival/ wedding/ function in winters is complete without a dessert made with nolen gur. The sheer variety of desserts that can be made using this lip smacking gur/ jaggery is endless. From payesh to pitheys, ice cream, sandesh, and so much more! Every household has their own version of this dish and today I am going to share with you how my mum cooks it. She is now here with me in KL, and she got some nolen gur packed for me from India. Yay!! S loves anything sweet and I am always looking for ways to satiate his sweet tooth, so what better than homemade payesh. Its gluten free and the best thing? It was cooked by mum and it tasted heavenly! Someone rightly said, Desserts is stressed spelled backwards 😀

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There are certain ‘musts’ in this recipe to make the authentic payesh. The first is Date Palm Jaggery or Nolen Gur/ Notun Gur. In India, this particular jaggery is available only in winters and it is an inherent part of the culinary tradition of Bengal in winters. It has a rich nutty flavour and simply melts in your mouth when you take a bite. The second one is the type of rice to be used, which is Gobindobhog (an aromatic rice). You can substitute it with basmati rice but it won’t be the real deal 🙂

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Ingredients (to serve 4-5 people):

  • 1 Litre full cream milk (full fat or full cream milk is essential for that creamy consistency)
  • 60-65gm gobindobhog/ basmati rice (this ratio is important! For every 1 l milk, approx. 60gm of rice to be used)
  • Nolen gur/ Date Palm Jaggery (no strict measurement for this, as per your taste)

*Note: If you don’t have date palm jaggery, you may substitute it with date syrup available in most groceries or brown sugar*

  • 2 tsp Raisins
  • Few crushed green cardamoms
  • 2-3 bay leaf
  • Almonds for garnishing

Method:

In a deep bottomed pan, heat the milk. Let it come to a boil while stirring continuously, so that no cream is formed. While the milk is boiling, add the crushed cardomoms and the bay leaves and keep stirring with the ladle until the milk thickens. Now add the rice into the pan (the rice should be washed and dried on a flat surface before adding into the milk). Again keep stirring and when the rice is completely cooked, throw in the jaggery or sugar and mix well till completely dissolved in milk. Once the pudding thickens to your desired consistency, add the raisins and switch off the flame after 2-3 minutes. Garnish with dry fruits of your choice. You may serve it hot or chilled, tastes great both ways 🙂

3 important tips to remember for the perfect payesh:

  1. Always use full cream milk for best results.
  2. While cooking, keep stirring the milk continuously so that no cream/ layer forms on top.
  3. Most importantly, keep in mind that the jaggery/ sugar should always be added after the rice is cooked perfectly. Once the sweet goes in, the rice stops getting cooked further.

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Gluten-free Besan Cheela (Savoury Pancakes with Chickpea Flour & Spices)

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Since last few days, S & I have been eating out a lot, mostly junk and calorie rich stuff because let’s just admit that best things in life are always fattening 😀 But as much as we love eating out, we also ensure that we eat clean most of the time. So I keep coming back to wholesome nutritious food and this New Year, I made a resolution to cut out processed food from my life and embrace real food.

The cheelas/ pancakes I made for lunch today were delightfully tasty and very healthy too. Chickpea flour, also known as besan/ gram flour, is gluten free. It is highly nutritious as it’s packed with protein, iron and fiber. For a guilt free indulgence, chickpea flour is definitely one of the best options and in India we use it to cook both savoury and sweet dishes.

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I will share healthy and tasty recipes from time to time. For now, note down the ingredients and method of making besan cheelas.

Ingredients (for 4-5 pancakes):

  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1 large tomato, finely chopped
  • 2-3 green chilies, finely chopped (depending on your heat tolerance)
  • 1 inch ginger piece, grated
  • 2 tbsp coriander leaves, chopped
  • For the batter:
  • 2 cups chickpea flour
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil (or any white oil would do)
  • Water to make a runny batter
  • Following spices to be added:
  • 1 tsp carom seeds/ ajwain
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds/ jeera
  • ½ tsp asafetida/ heeng
  • 1 tsp Kashmiri red chilly powder
  • ½ tsp coriander powder
  • ½ tsp garam masala powder
  • Salt to taste
  • A pinch of sugar

Method:

In a large bowl, take 2 cups of chickpea flour. Add in all the spices listed above. Mix well with a balloon whisk. Now throw in all the veggies into the bowl before adding water.

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This is done so that the flour absorbs all the moisture from the veggies, making it easy for us to understand the amount of water needed for the batter. Now slowly add water, until you get a runny batter. Mix well. Keep aside for 15-20 minutes.

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Heat oil in a tawa/ griddle. Pour some batter in the center of the griddle and spread evenly with a spatula or the back of a large spoon. Make sure that the pancake is not very thick. Let it cook for at least a minute or until you see the sides becoming brown and bubbles forming on top.

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Now drizzle some oil on the top and flip the pancake over. Drizzle oil on the sides and let it again cook for another 2 minutes. Keep flipping from time to time for a crispy finish.

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Serve hot with green chutney/ ketchup or some yogurt for a simple and nourishing meal 🙂

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Party Special ‘Spicy Chicken Drumsticks Curry’

Indian food is all about contrasting flavours. The way different spices and herbs come together in one dish is amazing and nothing less than a work of art. The once humble Indian chicken curry is now famous all over the world, but let me bust some myths here. There is really nothing called an Indian Chicken Curry because India is a land of cultural miscellany and so is the food- as diverse as it can get. So a chicken curry up north is dramatically different from its southern counterpart. In fact every state has a different take on the curry. So what you get in Jaipur will be quite different from the one in Kashmir or Calcutta or Amritsar or Hyderabad! So you see. You really can’t have a universal Indian Chicken curry.

Today I’ll sharing with you a recipe of my mum’s including her handy tips to cook the perfect chicken! This dish is a party winner and have been appreciated by many. I recently made a big bowl of it for our New Year’s party at a friend’s where we had a potluck night. I guess everyone loves potluck dinners. It’s half the work and double the fun 😀 and what better way to ring in the New Year than enjoying a hearty meal with friends and watching the spectacular fireworks from the terrace 🙂

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Recipe Ingredients:

  • 12-15 Chicken drumsticks
  • 3 medium sized tomatoes (chopped finely)
  • 6 fat cloves of garlic (crushed)
  • 1 inch ginger (crushed)
  • 3-4 slit green chilies (depending on your heat tolerance)
  • Whole garam masala for tempering (4 cloves, 5-6 green cardamom, 10 black pepper, 1 large stick of cinnamon)
  • 2 Bay leaf
  • 1 tsp Cumin seeds
  • 3/4th tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 tbsp Kashmiri red chili powder (this gives the gravy a luscious dark red colour)
  • 1 ½ tsp Cumin powder
  • 1 ½ tsp Coriander powder
  • Salt to taste
  • Sugar to taste
  • Fried onion juliennes (made from 6 large onions)
  • Fried cashews
  • Chopped coriander leaves
  • 4-5 tbsp Olive oil (you can use any white oil)

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Method:

Wash the chicken well. Heat a tbsp of oil in a deep kadhai/ wok and add the drumsticks. Sauté for couple of minutes until the chicken becomes golden brown. This retains the juices of the chicken which enhances its flavour (#Tip 1). Take out the pieces and the juice in a bowl.

* If you simply add raw pieces of chicken to your cooked masalas, then it won’t taste that great. So this is a handy tip for you guys.

In the same kadhai, heat some oil. Add the onions and a pinch of salt. This softens the onion faster (#Tip 2). Deep fry them until they become dark brown in colour (remember not to over fry them, else they will turn bitter). Remove with a slotted spoon. Take half of the onions and make a paste in a blender. We will use it for our gravy. Keep the remaining for garnishing.

Now add some oil in the same wok. When it becomes hot, add a tsp of sugar. This makes the colour of the gravy red and glossy (#Tip 3). Once the sugar is caramelised, add the whole garam masala, and bay leaf. Saute till you get a lovely aroma of the spices, add slit chilies and the onion paste. Fry well for 2 minutes. Add crushed ginger and garlic. Cook until the raw smell is gone. Now throw in the tomatoes and stir for a minute and cover with a lid. Let it cook on a low-med flame for 3-4 minutes.

This is the time to add all the spices. Take a small cup, add turmeric powder, cumin powder, coriander powder and red chili powder. Add some water and make a paste. This is done so that the masala won’t burn while frying (#Tip 4). Now add the paste into the kadhai. Fry for 3-4 minutes on a medium flame.

Now add the chicken pieces into the wok. Keep stirring for atleast 8-10 minutes or until you see oil separating from the spices. This is called ‘Koshano’ in Bengali/ bhuno in Hindi, basically sautéing :D. This step is very essential if you want velvety and succulent chicken (#Tip 5). Don’t add water during this stage.

Add 1 cup of water now and cover and cook on a low flame till the gravy thickens and clings onto the chicken drumsticks. The trick to making juicy, fall off the bone chicken requires cooking it on a low flame for a long time (#Tip 6).

The dish is ready. Garnish with chopped coriander, fried onions and cashew nuts. Serve hot with naan (Indian flat bread) or rice.

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BUMBU DESA: From the land of Kopi Luwak & Batik

Indonesia is my preferred destination for holidaying in the entire South East Asia. From the vibrant nightlife in Jakarta to the stunning natural beauty of Bali, the country has never ceased to spellbind me. So far Bali has been my favourite holiday spot. A land rich in culture, heritage, art & craft and of course food! My love for Indonesian food is pretty well known. The multitude of spices & herbs used in their food is what makes the cuisine a foodie’s delight. From their satays to bakso, gado-gado & rendang- every dish is scrumptious.

Few moments from my Bali trip 🙂

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Tanah lot, Bali

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Prawn Satay & Nasi Goreng Platter

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Grilled Tilapia

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A random flea market, Nusa Dua

I am always keen to try out new Indonesian eateries in town & when I learnt that Bumbu Desa, a popular restaurant chain in Indonesia has an outlet in KLCC, I decided to check it out. Honestly, this won’t be an exhaustive review as we sampled only a couple of dishes, but I can of course share my experience with you guys 🙂

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The restaurant is located on the 4th floor of Suria KLCC and with its warm lighting & elegant décor, it looked rather inviting. We were ushered in by a friendly wait staff and quickly asked for the menu as I was very hungry. There were many appetisers & main course to choose from but we decided to settle for their set menus (For a complete listing of their menu please visit Bumbu Desa Menu). I ordered Nasi Rabeg Kambing, which is a spicy mutton dish. The mutton came accompanied with Sayur Asem, Nasi, Peanut sauce (similar to gado-gado) & small disc shaped crackers.

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Nasi Rabeg Kambing

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A closer look

Sayur Asem is the perfect appetizer. Made with corn & squash, its sweet & sour taste made our tastebuds dance. Flavoured subtly, it is a very comforting soup. The peanut sauce was mildly spiced which balanced the hot & spicy mutton impeccably. About the mutton, I really have no words. Perfectly cooked, tender & juicy, & spicy without being too hot. I like my food very spicy, maybe my Indian palette is responsible for it, and so Indonesian food is an absolute winner for me & from whatever I had at Bumbu desa, I am coming back for sure, to try out more from their menu & give a better comprehensive review.

S had ordered Nasi Rendang Daging which he claimed was as good as the ones he had in Indonesia. The beef was succulent & tasted fabulous.

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Nasi Rendang Daging

The crackers in both the sets were unimpressive. They were neither crispy nor made any difference to the whole dish. I think one can do without it.

The wait staff was very friendly and obliged us every time we made any requests, from changing seats to clicking photographs, explaining the dish to us, etc. Do come and eat here if you want an authentic taste of Indonesia without burning a hole in your pocket.

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THE GANGA CAFÉ: Pure Desi Delight

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Read a lot of reviews about The Ganga Café on social media, got recommendations from friends as well, but somehow never had a chance to visit the restaurant. Being a meat lover, pure veg was never an option exciting enough to make a trip all the way from Tun Razak to Jalan Riong (On Lorong Kurau). But finally today, being 1st of Jan & a Sunday, S suggested we go there for lunch & I agreed. I was proven wrong & how! 😀

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We were greeted by one of the owners of the café, Mr. Prabodh Sheth who explained to us about the menu (Sundays are meant for only buffets) & went out of his way to make our experience memorable. His affable nature is what created my very first positive impression.

If you take pleasure in simple things in life & enjoy freshly cooked healthy traditional Indian fare, then Ganga Café is the place for you. I haven’t come across a place as such in KL. The café was pretty small but bustling with people which was a testimony to its popularity. I saw many Chinese take a fancy to veg Indian food which was very surprising for me.

Their lunch buffet spread had a pumpkin soup, masala chai, a salad, starters, main course & a dessert. All this for just RM21!! & unlimited helpings 😀 Can you beat that?!

Every single dish was freshly prepared using quality organic ingredients & no MSGs. My personal favourites were the dhokla, aloo tikki & onion pakodas from the starters. The pakodas were crunchy outside & juicy inside, dhoklas were superbly moist. I must give a special mention to the masala chai (tea) which complemented the snacks perfectly.

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The starters

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Among the mains, I simply loved the kadhi. In fact it was the best kadhi I’ve ever had. Rich, creamy with a lovely aroma of ginger & asafoetida, it was so comforting. I could have bowls after bowls of it with some rice. Throughout the meal I felt like I was at one of my close friend’s (who is a Gujarati) & eating food prepared by her mum.  Guess I needn’t say more.

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Main course

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I only wished there were more options for dessert 😀 After so much for yummy starters & main course I really wanted to have some sweets, & just a halwa (which was delightful by the way) didn’t satisfy me enough.

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But the highlight of my lunch was meeting the two owners of the café Meeta & Prabodh. The husband & wife duo also own the neighbouring Mediterranean veg restaurant, Barat.  You seldom meet people who are so passionate about their work & make you feel at home. A soul cleansing experience, The Ganga Café took me back home in India & renewed my love for fresh wholesome healthy food.

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Patissez (Bangsar, KL)- Of freakshakes & pastas

 

This quaint little café in the heart of Jalan Telawi in upscale Bangsar is slowly becoming one of my favourite places to eat out in KL. It’s the home of the original freakshakes (Patissez in Australia) which is quite popular for being ridiculously over the top. Look at the picture below to know what I mean 😀

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I had been pestering S to take me there for quite some time. But he being a little health conscious wasn’t too keen on my proposal. However finally he gave in on Christmas day. Yay!! 🙂

The location is one of my favourite spots, Bangsar. The look & feel of the eatery is similar to those charming little cafes you find in Paris, where you can sit undisturbed for hours, watching the world go by. Parking here is quite difficult as it’s a residential area & the nearest LRT is Bangsar (which is 5 mins drive from the café). So it’s better to take a cab to the place.

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We placed an order for two of their freakshakes-

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Cafiend
Espresso salted caramel shake, loads of drizzled espresso salted caramel, chocolate mousse, house made graham cracker & toasted marshmallow s’more

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Pretzellâ
Nutellary Nutella shake – lashings of Nutella – salty pretzels – vanilla mousse – Nutella dunked salty pretzels – pretzel dust

Both were insanely good but my personal favourite was the Pretzella. It was pure sin especially for worshippers of nutella like me. The salt and the crunch from the cute little pretzels balanced the sweetness of the nutella to perfection. All freakshakes are priced at RM23.

One thing I must mention is the service. Unfortunately because of the rush, the service was pretty slow that day but I didn’t mind because the staff were very friendly and polite. They always had a smile on their faces whenever we approached them.

For our mains we ordered pasta. Although Patissez doesn’t offer a wide range of pasta dishes, but what they do offer is irresistible. In fact I have had my best pasta here at Patissez.

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Kale Pesto Fettuccini 

This one was vegetarian. The fettuccini cooked with Portobello mushroom, Confit cherry tomatoes & kale pesto, with generous cubes of parmesan cheese was in one word heavenly! The cheese coated deep fried zucchini was complementing the dish superbly.

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Aglio Olio Chicken Bacon

The angel hair pasta was perfectly seasoned with chili flakes in olive oil. The chicken bacon was delightfully crispy and I wished I could have some more.

Overall, this place is a must visit. It’s perfect for a first date, a girls’ day out or even a casual business meeting. A lunch for two would set you back by around 100RM.

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Sanook- A little thai gem

So guess who’s back from a hiatus 🙂

2016 has been a roller-coaster ride, some ups, many downs 😦 but that’s life. What I learned is that you should treasure each and every moment you spend with your dear ones and never let the passion in you die.

So I have decided to follow my love for all things food more fervently. Along with experimenting in the kitchen and sharing recipes, I would also dabble in restaurant (from small roadside shack to a 5 star) reviews specifically keeping in mind our Indian travelers. We Indians love to travel and South East Asia is one of our favourites. The enormous range of cuisines and flavours are simply overwhelming. From Nasi Lemak to Gado Gado, Bibimbap to Mee Goreng, Satays to Tutu cakes- one can’t even envisage the sheer variety on offer. So I will mostly tell you guys about places to eat keeping in mind our palette 😀 Basically a handy guide not just for travelers but also for Indians who are new to KL and plan to set base for a while.

That brings me to my very first restaurant review- Sanook (Pavilion Mall, KL)

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A Thai restaurant, Sanook is a small cozy eatery located at a corner in Pavilion mall, Bukit Bintang, KL. The other outlet is at Sunway Pyramid West Hotel. The husband and I, let’s call him S here, were craving for some Thai food, while we were pottering around the upscale mall. So we headed to the area that housed the most eateries. Looking around for some time, we finally spotted Sanook- a little further from Food Republic (food court at Pavilion). The lively décor and welcoming staff are hard to miss.

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The place was relatively empty for a Saturday and we were wondering if we made the right choice. But then they say, never judge a book by its cover, so we decided to check in anyway. The menu had many Thai starters and main courses to choose from, along with few options for sushi burgers. The husband ordered Original Pad Thai-Chicken, which is his favourite. In fact sometimes I wonder if he is on a secret mission to discover the best Pad Thai ever 😀 The pad thai looked delish and the portion was enough for one. The crunch of the peanuts, juiciness of the tender chicken, spice from the chilly, tang of the lemon along with the warm rice noodles, were a riot of flavours in the mouth. But what upset me in the beginning was that they didn’t serve lemon wedges with the noodles!! Isn’t it a crime? Pad thai without lemon?? But they made up for that with their taste. The pad thai was absolutely lip-smacking! I would have preferred a little more sprinkling of salt though, but S didn’t seem to mind. Overall it was very scrumptious.

20161218_142219Pad Thai

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I had ordered for Tom Yum Seafood Fried rice and Spicy Red Curry Chicken in a peanut based sauce.The curry was not too spicy, but nonetheless flavourful with generous chunks of boneless chicken pieces. The coconut milk was very well balanced with the spices and the kaffir lime. None of the flavours were overpowering which I feel is the real hallmark of Thai food. But the insane number of chunky galangal pieces I found in my curry was sort of annoying and distracting me from enjoying the dish to the fullest. But overall, it was delightful.

20161218_142913Spicy Red Curry Chicken in a Peanut based sauce

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However the star of the night was definitely the fried rice. It was in fact one of the best tom yum rice I ever had. The fresh prawns, fleshy calamari, sharp kaffir lime leaves, fragrant lemongrass, spicy red chillis and the aroma of crushed shallots and garlic, in just the right measure is what made the dish mouthwatering. I just couldn’t have enough of it. In fact I wanted to pack some for home.

20161218_142149Tom Yum Seafood Fried Rice

Sanook is pretty easy on the pocket. A similar dinner for two would cost around 80-100RM. So do check this place out. I am definitely returning soon.

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